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    From left, Ald. Michelle Harris (8) and Ald. Greg Mitchell (7) observe a community meeting about the plan to temporarily house migrants at the former South Shore High School building. [Don Vincent/The Daily Line]

    Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s office and Ald. Michelle Harris (8) hosted a community meeting Thursday evening in front of an unruly, often disruptive crowd that voiced opposition to the city’s plan to shelter at least 250 migrants, including asylum seekers, at the former South Shore High School building on Constance Avenue in the 8th Ward. 

    Harris agreed with the crowd of attendees, saying she was opposed to the housing of migrants at the school on the grounds that the city and country’s “humanitarian crisis” was not the 8th Ward’s crisis.

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    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle is pictured at a polling location in June 2022. [Don Vincent/The Daily Line] 

    Costs to help migrants being sent to Illinois as well as provide health care for undocumented residents already living in Illinois are putting pressure on the state’s budget as a report finds Illinois will not have a surplus this year as big as experts once thought.  

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    The Dirksen Federal Building in Chicago is pictured.  

    Four ComEd officials and close allies of former House Speaker Mike Madigan were found guilty Tuesday on all charges in a sweeping corruption trial that dug into the depths of Illinois’ legislative process. 

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    Wednesday marked Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s final City Council meeting as mayor. [Don Vincent/The Daily Line] 

    Aldermen spent two hours Wednesday heaping praise on their retiring colleagues and outgoing Mayor Lori Lightfoot, who presided over her final City Council meeting before Mayor-elect Brandon Johnson is sworn in May 15. 

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    Chicago’s next mayor Brandon Johnson, a former middle school teacher and union organizer, will be the first in recent memory with children in the Chicago Public Schools and the last with mayoral control of the district. [Alex Wroblewski / Getty Images]

    Brandon Johnson took an unconventional path to becoming Chicago’s next mayor.

    A decade ago, Johnson, 47, was teaching middle school at Jenner Academy of the Arts, which served mostly low-income Black students from the Cabrini-Green public housing complex. In 2012, he became an organizer for the Chicago Teachers Union, and in 2018, he was elected to the Cook County Board of Commissioners. 

    Now he will be the first mayor in recent memory with children in Chicago Public Schools and the last to have control of the school system before it transitions to an elected school board

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    Mayor-elect Brandon Johnson smiles upon the crowd during his victory speech Tuesday evening. [Don Vincent/The Daily Line]

    Cook County Comm. Brandon Johnson (D-1) will be the city’s next mayor after defeating former Chicago Public Schools CEO Paul Vallas in a contentious runoff election. Johnson will become the fourth Black mayor.

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    Former CPS CEO Paul Vallas and Cook County Comm. Brandon Johnson give victory speeches at Election Night watch parties on Feb. 28, 2023, as both head into an April runoff for mayor. [Don Vincent/The Daily Line]

    Chicago mayoral candidate Paul Vallas spent the last several weeks collecting nearly double the amount of donations compared to Cook County Comm. Brandon Johnson (D-1) as Vallas has earned endorsements from across the political spectrum and from key labor groups.

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    Ald. Sophia King (4), chair of the City Council Progressive Caucus who ran as a mayoral candidate in the Feb. 28 election, endorsed former Chicago Public Schools CEO Paul Vallas in the mayoral runoff. But a group of nine aldermen who are members of the Progressive Caucus issued a statement saying King’s endorsement doesn’t speak for the caucus. 

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    Joe Dunne and Ald. Gilbert Villegas (36) are two aldermanic candidates using red boxes on their websites. [Courtesy photos]

    Candidates in multiple aldermanic runoffs are using red boxes on their campaign websites often used to highlight approved ad messaging to independent political action committees, a strategy that — while not explicitly banned in Illinois — some election experts say essentially skirts legal prohibitions on coordination between campaigns and outside PACs.

    Joe Dunne, an affordable housing developer competing in the 48th Ward, and Ald. Gilbert Villegas (36), who is defending his City Council seat in the April runoff, both have red boxes on their websites. The boxed text includes messaging about both the candidates and their opponents. 

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    From top left, Ald. Daniel La Spata, Ald. Jim Gardiner and Ald. Chris Taliaferro and from bottom left, Sam Royko, Megan Mathias and CB Johnson. (courtesy photos) 

    Fourteen aldermanic races are set to be decided with a runoff election on April 4, according to official election results published by the Chicago Board of Elections Wednesday.